ENCOURAGING READING FOR KIDS IN AN ONLINE TEFL TEACHING JOBS

how-to-motivate-students-reading

Limiting the reading strategy use to shallow themes teaches students to think in a very restricted way about reading and its purpose. Once a strategy has been employed and comprehension gained from the text, if that meaning is trivial, then the student is not compelled to initiate the use of the strategy in the future, nor are they excited about beginning a new text, since there is no meaningful knowledge to be gained.

Keep the following in mind when coaching students in online teaching jobs English so as to have an efficient and effective result at the end of the day:

Excessive Control Undermines Ownership

A teacher who controls every aspect of reading instruction is sending the clear message to students that their opinions and preferences do not matter. If you teach English online from home, students do not have any options in designing their learning, they become passive spectators to the teacher’s agenda.

As a result, students have no sense of ownership of the strategies being taught, the text used, or the knowledge presented, and have no reason to read that text. When it comes time to share the results of the learning experience, students feel no accountability. For many students, this lack of accountability means a failure to complete tasks and the likelihood that information is forgotten as soon as the experience is over.

Based on observations of classrooms, it was found that excessive control included frequent directives, interfering with the preferred pace of learning, and suppressing critical thinking. Such over-control resulted in behaviors of anger, anxiety, and resentment toward the teacher among fourth and fifth-grade students.

Readers need to establish and maintain a state of flow, or engagement while reading. If readers are constantly interrupted or made to start and stop at the teacher’s will, there is no feeling of ownership or personal responsibility for the reading assignment. Students who sense that their opinions and preferences are not heard and not valued are made to feel unimportant and powerless in the classroom.

This can transfer to the view that the reading activity itself is unimportant. There is no need for maintenance of self-regulation if the teacher is making all of the decisions. Students may follow along passively, without any decision-making processes taking place, and without the benefit of the trial and error involved in developing effective learning processes.

In online TEFL teaching jobs, Lack of ownership also diminishes the selection and use of reading strategies. When teachers give a trivial choice, such as which pen color to use, students know the choice is irrelevant to their learning and provides no connection between that student and reading. Students who are not allowed to make choices about which strategy to use or how to use it are being taught to view reading in a very limited manner, where there is only one way to approach a problem and no alternatives are presented. With little ownership, students’ reasons for reading become external. They may say “The teacher wants it done,” or “I’m only reading because I have to.” These external reasons are likely to lead to the superficial use of strategies and lower proficiency in challenging tasks.

A first step for thinking about supporting motivation more fully is self-appraisal. One starting point for self-appraisal is to use conversational questionnaires about motivation in the classroom. Useful inquiries can be made into the students’ viewpoint. Educators can explore the teachers’ viewpoint (teacher questionnaire).

Regardless of which tools for self-improvement may be used, the implications of this article are that educators can advance the breadth and depth of students’ reading by explicitly and systematically nourishing their practices that affirm students’ motivations as readers, so these guides can help you to achieve your aim of getting your students motivated in an online ESL class.

Reading identity

Reading identity refers to the extent that individual values reading as personally important, and views success in reading as an important goal. Regrettably, very little is known about educational conditions that foster the development of reading identity. However, if you teach English online from home, it is well established that high achievers tend to identify with school and feel a sense of belonging in the classroom. Students who identify themselves as readers are the ones who are more likely to read and to gain knowledge from reading. Teachers support this by explaining that texts are important and functional, and that reading is relevant for student long-term interest and personal development. Under the best conditions, students connect reading skill and life outcomes such as career attainment and personal success.

Although there is little research on this issue, we suggest that when teachers model their own personal identification as readers and make explicit the fact that they value reading, students may perceive reading as beneficial and worthwhile. When teachers support students’ identity as readers, students have a commitment to complete the act of reading, not just to the satisfaction of the teacher, but to their own personal standard of excellence. This may result in a sense of accomplishment once a reading task is mastered that goes beyond the teacher and lesson, as the student is fulfilling his own personal sense of responsibility to excel at reading.

As students progress through school, their identity as learners and readers can progressively deteriorate. Young children typically give high ratings to reading and learning. However, as students approach the end of the elementary grades, many students cease to aspire to higher achievement or proficiency in tasks such as reading on any subject matter.

As they enter middle school, some students detach their sense of self-worth from school success. This is especially true for African-American or Hispanic students. Beginning in grades seven and eight, many of these minority students reject reading achievement and view it as unimportant. It was shown that African American and Hispanic students cease to value achievement in middle school. As it was documented for a national sample, African-American males increasingly disidentify with academics through middle and high school.

Their sense of self-worth progressively detaches from their level of achievement. They do not experience any benefit that justifies putting effort into reading. The school is not viewed as an avenue for advancement or success but is merely a requirement imposed on them. It was found that African American students often disengage themselves from evaluations in order to prevent unfavorable appraisals of their achievements.

Although there is little evidence on this issue, it is likely that when teachers encourage students to make connections with reading and to apply their personal experiences in the classroom, students may increase their engagement with the text. Teachers’ interpersonal relationships with students are also likely to impact their engagement favorably, which may foster their process of identification in the long term.

Finally, the concepts within reading lessons should span several days or even weeks. This allows students to gain a sense of becoming experts in a given topic or concept. For online teaching jobs English, introducing the concept in a way that accounts for students’ prior knowledge can in itself take multiple lessons to accomplish. Then, providing students with hands-on experiences and exposure to multiple texts should be the core piece of the unit, and again may span several days or weeks. Teachers can conclude with a culminating project that lets students express their gained conceptual knowledge.

These few guides are sure ways that can effortlessly help you in motivating your ESL students in an online ESL class without much hassle.

Happy Teaching!     Teacher Daniel 🙂

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